This Dark Age

A manual for life in the modern world.

By Daniel Schwindt

NOTICE:
This Dark Age is now available in paperback on Amazon. The print version is MUCH cleaner than this online version, which is largely unedited and has fallen by the wayside as the project has grown. If you’ve appreciated my writing, please consider leaving a review on the relevant paperback volumes. The print edition also includes new sections (Military History, War Psychology, Dogmatic Theology).

Volume 1 | Volume 2 | Volume 3| Volume 4 | Volume 5 | Volume 6

Basic principles of traditional art

The work itself must conform its intended use; any superadded symbolism must conform to the symbolism inherent in the object or medium; what is essential and what is accessory in the work must be harmoniously arranged and not opposed; just as the material must conform to the use of the work, the treatment of the material must conform to the nature of that material; finally, the work must not give an illusion of being other than what it is. Obvious things like artificial antiquing to satisfy a consumerist nostalgia would be out of the question, but also less obvious things like naturalistic sculpture wherein inert matter is treated as if endowed with life. Foreshortening and the use of shadows have the same effect and break the same rules when used in painting upon a plane surface. These examples alone should make it clear why the art of the Egyptians, for example, is superior, from a Sacred point of view and as a support for contemplation, than the works of the Renaissance.

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