This Dark Age

A manual for life in the modern world.

By Daniel Schwindt

NOTICE:
This Dark Age is now available in paperback on Amazon. The print version is MUCH cleaner than this online version, which is largely unedited and has fallen by the wayside as the project has grown. If you’ve appreciated my writing, please consider leaving a review on the relevant paperback volumes. The print edition also includes new sections (Military History, War Psychology, Dogmatic Theology).

Volume 1 | Volume 2 | Volume 3| Volume 4 | Volume 5 | Volume 6

Decadence around the world

Both the East and the West are in the advanced stages of decadence. Those are wrong who would set the East up against the West as if the one was impervious to the onslaught of the Dark Age, which affects everyone if it affects anyone. If some people seem to miss this point, it is because they express their decadence in very different ways due to a difference in nature. They manifest two types of decadence that are almost the inverse of one another. We could say that the decadence of the East resembles the natural decay of an aging creature, becoming progressively weaker and more senile as death approaches. This decay is passive–it is suffered. The decadence of the West, however, is strikingly different in that it is active and takes the form of a consciously chosen path. This is why we can speak of a “modern mentality” when referring to the West. This distinction–active and consciously chosen error vs. what we can only describe as “the inertia of the dying” in the East–is what gives the West its illusion of superiority, since it leads to a rapid and rabid material development that has spanned the globe and created incredible affluence for the nations who’ve driven it. But both suffer from the same “dying out” of intellectuality and spiritual vitality. The two paths simply show two possible results of a civilization that begins to lose its connection with transcendence. It either falls asleep or becomes delirious, the latter clearly being for more dangerous because far more aggressive.

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