This Dark Age

A manual for life in the modern world.

By Daniel Schwindt

Faith and morals

Many of the Church’s critics tend to parrot tirelessly certain phrases whenever a pope speaks about economic or political problems. They say that the Church’s competence lies in “faith and morals,” the obvious implication being that socio-economic issues are excluded from these two categories. Unfortunately, this is not the traditional understanding of social, economic, and political life. Morality, in fact, pervades all of these areas. Justice is the foundation of morality, and it is undeniable that economic affairs in particular are riddled with problems of justice. If these problems are left unanswered, they may result in chaos. This is why canon law claims:

“To the Church belongs the right always and everywhere to announce moral principles, including those pertaining to the social order, and to make judgments on any human affairs to the extent that they are required by the fundamental rights of the human person or the salvation of souls.”[1]

[1] Code of Canon Law, canon 747, § 2.

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