This Dark Age

A manual for life in the modern world.

By Daniel Schwindt

NOTICE:
This Dark Age is now available in paperback on Amazon. The print version is MUCH cleaner than this online version, which is largely unedited and has fallen by the wayside as the project has grown. If you’ve appreciated my writing, please consider leaving a review on the relevant paperback volumes. The print edition also includes new sections (Military History, War Psychology, Dogmatic Theology).

Volume 1 | Volume 2 | Volume 3| Volume 4 | Volume 5 | Volume 6

History and universality

Between the Hinayana and Mahayana there is a difference in emphasis similar to that between Aristotle and Plato, respectively: the former was a ‘scientific philosopher’ and so also is the Buddha of the Hinayana; the latter was a mystic and a metaphysician and so also is the Buddha of the Mahayana. Although the comparison between Buddhism and Greek philosophical development is of course weak, it is apt to illustrate the point that this difference does not imply a contradiction but rather a difference in point of view with its distinctive emphasis.

It is said that the Hinayana is rooted in the context of history, whereas the Mahayana is rooted in myth and it is by this characteristic that it is enabled to become universal, since by transcending time is also transcends place, which is to say, becomes susceptible to adaption in various cultures.

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