This Dark Age

A manual for life in the modern world.

By Daniel Schwindt

NOTICE:
This Dark Age is now available in paperback on Amazon. The print version is MUCH cleaner than this online version, which is largely unedited and has fallen by the wayside as the project has grown. If you’ve appreciated my writing, please consider leaving a review on the relevant paperback volumes. The print edition also includes new sections (Military History, War Psychology, Dogmatic Theology).

Volume 1 | Volume 2 | Volume 3| Volume 4 | Volume 5 | Volume 6

Lasting, grave, and certain

This first condition is the most demanding: it places before us three elements which must all be met in order to justify military force. If the threat is grave but not certain, or certain but not grave, or certain and grave but not lasting, then war is not justified. For this reason, it is this first condition which is most often ignored, with nations going to war or, in the case of the United States forcing Japan to open itself to trade with the West, threatening war, over nothing but economic advantage; or, in the case of the war in Iraq, wars are entered on hearsay and loose hypothesis.

Furthermore, even if this condition—the most stringent—is met, we can then proceed to the remaining conditions, which must also be met. All of these conditions must be met each and every time.

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