This Dark Age

A manual for life in the modern world.

By Daniel Schwindt

Political groups and local situations

It often happens, as with the Taliban in Afghanistan, that local groups rise to power due to reasons that are political rather than religious and can exercise significant influence in a local area. We should keep in mind that just because a certain group is ‘Islamic’ and claims religious motives, this does not mean that they represent a part of the Islamic mainstream or that they even qualify as a sect within Islam. Religion is not every man for himself, and in every case the traditional mainstream has the prerogative of granting or withholding the status of legitimacy to a certain group. Thus, we should look to the mainstream and its attitude toward a movement or group before assuming that these few individuals ‘speak for’ the Islamic world. As Christ had put it: “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only the one who does the will of my Father.” It likewise true of any religious society that evil men within it will do evil things in the name of god, and if it appears distasteful to us that this occurs, we should first consider the fact that the modern West does nothing in the name of religion, which is evidence, not of virtue, but of a practical atheism, and is not exactly laudable. The West commits its share of evil, but does so in the name of patriotism, economic liberation, and what-have-you, and for this absence of religious identity we somehow manage to congratulate ourselves on being religiously superior.  Suffice it to say that Muslims, especially within the Arabic world, are immersed in religiosity, and so their evils will always be committed with an air of religious fervor, just as Western crimes are committed with an air of nationalistic or ideological fervor, and although their way seems more repugnant, it is really more human and often more honest.

Share This