This Dark Age

A manual for life in the modern world.

By Daniel Schwindt

NOTICE:
This Dark Age is now available in paperback on Amazon. The print version is MUCH cleaner than this online version, which is largely unedited and has fallen by the wayside as the project has grown. If you’ve appreciated my writing, please consider leaving a review on the relevant paperback volumes. The print edition also includes new sections (Military History, War Psychology, Dogmatic Theology).

Volume 1 | Volume 2 | Volume 3| Volume 4 | Volume 5 | Volume 6

Respect for creation cannot coincide with present lifestyle

The lifestyle of hedonism, consumerism, and maximized profit are in direct opposition to the proper valuation of natural resources and ecology,[1] whether we are talking about its consideration as capital, the enrichment provided by its beauty, or its witness to God’s glory. Of these, the latter two are particularly non-economic values which market logic cannot in any way account for.[2] In fact, it is difficult to conceive of the environmental problem outside of the context of modern economic errors such as maximized profit and the consumerist mentality.[3] The doctrine of self-interest in particular has no place in a society respectful of the environment,[4] which cannot withstand opportunistic exploitation with no regard to the present or future state of humanity. Concern for the created world is a duty—a possession of God’s gifted to the whole human race[5]—and must be considered as linked with the principle of the universal destination of goods. To squander resources and sully the land is not merely to be guilty of individual acts of irresponsibility, but is to directly attack the rights of others:

“The environment is God’s gift to everyone, and in our use of it we have a responsibility towards the poor, towards future generations and towards humanity as a whole…Our duties towards the environment are linked to our duties towards the human person, considered in himself and in relation to others. It would be wrong to uphold one set of duties while trampling on the other.”[6]

[1] CV, 51.

[2] CA, 40.

[3] CA, 37.

[4] SRS, 34.

[5] Lev 25:23.

[6] CV, 48, 51.

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