This Dark Age

A manual for life in the modern world.

By Daniel Schwindt

NOTICE:
This Dark Age is now available in paperback on Amazon. The print version is MUCH cleaner than this online version, which is largely unedited and has fallen by the wayside as the project has grown. If you’ve appreciated my writing, please consider leaving a review on the relevant paperback volumes. The print edition also includes new sections (Military History, War Psychology, Dogmatic Theology).

Volume 1 | Volume 2 | Volume 3| Volume 4 | Volume 5 | Volume 6

Some apparent difficulties involved in the use of physical force

There are still some difficulties involved in the use of force that we must examine, difficulties that would seem to present serious problems with its application. First and foremost, it is obvious that the use of physical force does not seek the consent of the individual but acts against his will. Can this be justified?

We have already said that the criteria for resistance to external evil, especially in the form of physical intervention in the lives of others, are primarily love and spiritual knowledge.

To clarify, we can say that the whole reason for accepting and respecting the ‘dignity’ of the free will, and for giving those in possession of will some degree of personal liberty, is the fact of our spirituality, which means that, if we have dignity, it is because we are endowed by God with dignity. We respect the liberty of persons on this spiritual basis and without it all talk of human dignity falls short.

Likewise, what gives legitimacy to our external acts is the fact of their origin in such a spiritualized free will, since a will that is not spiritualized is not free. If a man is spiritually awake and his self-government thereby intact, then even his external errors are not immediately subject to correction by the imposition of an external will, because it is assumed that he will use his own will to correct his own errors. It is obvious that this is the first choice and that we should not impose our will on a person who is fully capable of self-imposing their own within the domain of their person.

What happens when these conditions are not present? What happens if a person has never received adequate spiritual education and is in possession of a malformed conscience and has no ability to conduct themselves according to the good? What happens when a person is so weak-willed that they cannot control their lower self and when corruption bleeds out into relationships with others and threatens their well-being in turn?

Share This