This Dark Age

A manual for life in the modern world.

By Daniel Schwindt

The greater the spiritual insight, the greater the prerogative

Here we come upon a guiding principle that must be kept in mind regarding love as a motive for intervening in the lives of others.

The fundamental reason that God is permitted to take the lives of his creatures is that God’s spiritual insight exceeds that of any creature by an unfathomable degree; and since it is said that God loves humanity perfectly and has perfect spiritual insight, his prerogative for intervention is absolute. If he takes the life of a creature, no injustice is done, and no abuse has occurred. His prerogative for action is in proportion to the truth of his love.

The reason that creatures are generally prohibited from killing one another and, on the social level, strongly cautioned against even minor interventions in each other’s lives, is that their spiritual insight is always very dim, and therefore their love is so susceptible to error that their prerogative for intervention must be placed within narrow limits.

This does not mean that no prerogative exists, but that it is important to understand the nature of the prerogative. In comparison to the prerogative of the divine, that of the creature is minimal. The point, however, is not to explain away the prerogative, but to indicate decisively that to love someone and to act on that love, I must have a degree of spiritual sightedness. If this vision is lacking, then my love is ‘blind’ in the worst possible way, and I am likely to harm the beloved even when I am trying to help them.

We will develop this issue of spiritual insight and love. For now, we must simply make the point that if the imposition of a will on a being is to be justified, it must be a matter of love, love of the spiritual good of the beloved, and this requires that the lover know in what that consists.

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